Child Psychology Course Online | learndirect

Child Psychology

Overview

If you are keen to know more about the mental, social and emotional development of children from birth through to adolescence, then this is the perfect course for you. Child psychology examines changes in motor skills, cognitive development, language acquisition, and identity formation.

This in-depth course will offer you insight into the psychological changes that the child goes through from infancy through the teenage years. Beyond the fundamental knowledge of children development, it will provide an essential overview of why children behave the way they do.

The Child Psychology Diploma is an essential resource for anyone working with children, those who intend to take up a counselling career or simply parents who would like to better understand their own child’s development. 


How does the course work? 

Once enrolled, students will be given access to the course materials where they will find learning resources that are educational, interactive and easy to follow. Everything you will need to successfully complete the course will be included in the learning materials. 

Additionally, you will have access to communicate with our tutors via phone, email or through our online platform. Further advice and guidance is also available through a hub of likeminded learners who you can reach out to over the virtual portal.  

A great deal of flexibility is offered with distance learning; but self-motivation and discipline are essential to your achievement. However, with the support of our dedicated tutors and great student network, you will find your feet in no time.

Each lesson will be followed by a question paper that needs to be completed and returned to your tutor. You should allow at least 1 - 2 hours of study to complete each question paper.

Modules

Module One major developmental issues

Unit One: The first year of life

  • Infant reflexes; Social development during the first year of life including the social smile and onset of fear of strangers.

Unit Two: The formation of attachments

  • Imprinting; Attachment (Bowlby) including cross-cultural studies; Harlow and surrogate mothers; Relevance of animal studies in child development.

Unit Three: Consequences of breakdowns in attachments

  • Maternal deprivation; Implications of theories of attachment and maternal deprivation when placing children with surrogates.

Unit Four: The home, family and school

  • Group vs family care and studies of effects of maternal employment and father absent families; Importance of peers and siblings.

Unit Five: Basic principles of research methods

  • Nature and purpose of research, what is an experiment, supporting and refuting hypotheses, independent and dependent variables, control of variables, standardised instructions and procedures, methods of sampling, design of investigations.

Unit Six: The development of visual pperception

  • Introduction to the nature/nurture debate on visual perception; Fantz - form perception; Gibson and Walk - depth perception; how the physiology of the human visual system helps us judge depth and distance; Bower - size constancy; animal experiments on early sensory deprivation.

Unit Seven: The development of language and ccommunication

  • Development of non-verbal communication in humans, gestures etc; comparisons with non-human primates; outline of language development in humans; including naturalistic observational in humans; including naturalistic observational studies and criticisms of these; Innate and reinforcement theories.

Unit Eight: Intelligence and intelligence testing

  • Definitions of intelligence; mental age and IQ; Tests of intelligence; Advantages and disadvantages of IQ testing.

Unit Nine: The nature / nurture debate in the study of intelligence

  • Twins studies; stability of IQ; Are early experiences decisive for later development?

Unit Ten: Data collection and interpretation

  • Tables and histograms, correlation and scattergrams; Mean; Range; Drawing conclusions from data.

Module Two:  The child as an individual

Unit Eleven: How Children Think

  • Piaget's theory of cognitive development; including studies of egocentrism and criticisms of his work.

Unit Twelve: Learning Theory - How behaviour is acquired

  • Learning and conditioning - classical conditioning and operant conditioning; including explanations of extinction, discrimination and generalisation; positive and negative reinforcement; Social Learning Theory and criticisms.

Unit Thirteen: Freud's psychodynamic theory - An alternative approach

  • Personality structure, 5 stage theory, criticisms.

Unit Fourteen: Moral development

  • Definition in psychological terms; investigation of moral behaviour, moral feelings and moral judgement.

Unit Fifteen: The development of gender roles

  • Sex-typing; Gender identity; Biological, social and cultural theories.

Unit Sixteen: Aggression in children

  • Biological basis of aggression; Psychological theory and aggression; Aggression as a learned response;
  • Imitation of aggression; viewing violence; Punishment for aggression; sex differences in aggression.

Unit Seventeen: Methods used in child development research

  • Observational, Survey, Correlational, Experimental - advantages and disadvantages.

Unit Eighteen: Play

  • The importance of play to learning;
  • Piaget's theory of play; forms of play;
  • Relevance of psychological theories to pre-school education; Play and learning in nursery schools; Play therapy.

Unit Nineteen: Learning in school

  • Programmed learning and its relationship to learning theory - advantages and disadvantages; Discovery learning and its effectiveness.

Unit Twenty: Behaviour modification

  • Explanation and examples; Relationship to learning theory; Points systems, Advantages and disadvantages.

Requirements

The course has been designed to be accessible to people without prior knowledge of the subject or academic background. As such, there are no entry requirements. 

The approximate amount of time required to complete the course is: 200 hours

Qualifications

On successful completion of the course you will be issued with the Endorsed Award from ABC Awards:

Level 4 Child Psychology Certificate of Achievement

At the end of this course successful learners will receive a Certificate of Achievement by ABC Awards and a Learner Unit Summary (which lists the details of all the units you have completed as part of your course).

The course has been endorsed under the ABC Awards' Quality Licence Scheme. This means that learndirect have undergone an external quality check to ensure that the organisation and the courses it offers, meet certain quality criteria. The completion of this course alone does not lead to an Ofqual regulated qualification but may be used as evidence of knowledge and skills towards regulated qualifications in the future. The unit summary can be used as evidence towards Recognition of Prior Learning if you wish to progress your studies in this sector. To this end the learning outcomes of the course have been benchmarked at Level 4 against level descriptors published by Ofqual, to indicate the depth of study and level of difficulty involved in successful completion by the learner.

The course itself has been designed by learndirect to meet specific learners' or employers' requirements. ABC Awards' endorsement involves a robust and rigorous quality audit by external inspectors to ensure quality is consistently met. A regular review of courses is carried out as part of the endorsement process.

To view a sample of the ABC Certificate of Achievement, please click here

To view a sample of the ABC Learner Unit Summary, please click here

Developing your career

The course has been designed to be accessible to people without prior knowledge of the subject or academic background. As such, there are no entry requirements. 

The approximate amount of time required to complete the course is: 200 hours

If you wish to build your career in child psychology, you could continue your training and education to become a child psychologist working in schools, hospitals, mental health clinics, and more, with a starting salary of £25,000*/year. Another new and exciting opportunity could be to open your own practice.

The role of a child psychologist often involves working with a range of clients, from infants and toddlers to children and teens – though sometimes they specialise in working with a particular age group. Child psychologists help to understand, prevent, diagnose and treat developmental, cognitive, social and emotional issues.

*Source: careersinpsychology.co.uk, Nov. 2017

If you are keen to know more about the mental, social and emotional development of children from birth through to adolescence, then this is the perfect course for you. Child psychology examines changes in motor skills, cognitive development, language acquisition, and identity formation.

This in-depth course will offer you insight into the psychological changes that the child goes through from infancy through the teenage years. Beyond the fundamental knowledge of children development, it will provide an essential overview of why children behave the way they do.

The Child Psychology Diploma is an essential resource for anyone working with children, those who intend to take up a counselling career or simply parents who would like to better understand their own child’s development. 


How does the course work? 

Once enrolled, students will be given access to the course materials where they will find learning resources that are educational, interactive and easy to follow. Everything you will need to successfully complete the course will be included in the learning materials. 

Additionally, you will have access to communicate with our tutors via phone, email or through our online platform. Further advice and guidance is also available through a hub of likeminded learners who you can reach out to over the virtual portal.  

A great deal of flexibility is offered with distance learning; but self-motivation and discipline are essential to your achievement. However, with the support of our dedicated tutors and great student network, you will find your feet in no time.

Each lesson will be followed by a question paper that needs to be completed and returned to your tutor. You should allow at least 1 - 2 hours of study to complete each question paper.

Modules

Module One major developmental issues

Unit One: The first year of life

  • Infant reflexes; Social development during the first year of life including the social smile and onset of fear of strangers.

Unit Two: The formation of attachments

  • Imprinting; Attachment (Bowlby) including cross-cultural studies; Harlow and surrogate mothers; Relevance of animal studies in child development.

Unit Three: Consequences of breakdowns in attachments

  • Maternal deprivation; Implications of theories of attachment and maternal deprivation when placing children with surrogates.

Unit Four: The home, family and school

  • Group vs family care and studies of effects of maternal employment and father absent families; Importance of peers and siblings.

Unit Five: Basic principles of research methods

  • Nature and purpose of research, what is an experiment, supporting and refuting hypotheses, independent and dependent variables, control of variables, standardised instructions and procedures, methods of sampling, design of investigations.

Unit Six: The development of visual pperception

  • Introduction to the nature/nurture debate on visual perception; Fantz - form perception; Gibson and Walk - depth perception; how the physiology of the human visual system helps us judge depth and distance; Bower - size constancy; animal experiments on early sensory deprivation.

Unit Seven: The development of language and ccommunication

  • Development of non-verbal communication in humans, gestures etc; comparisons with non-human primates; outline of language development in humans; including naturalistic observational in humans; including naturalistic observational studies and criticisms of these; Innate and reinforcement theories.

Unit Eight: Intelligence and intelligence testing

  • Definitions of intelligence; mental age and IQ; Tests of intelligence; Advantages and disadvantages of IQ testing.

Unit Nine: The nature / nurture debate in the study of intelligence

  • Twins studies; stability of IQ; Are early experiences decisive for later development?

Unit Ten: Data collection and interpretation

  • Tables and histograms, correlation and scattergrams; Mean; Range; Drawing conclusions from data.

Module Two:  The child as an individual

Unit Eleven: How Children Think

  • Piaget's theory of cognitive development; including studies of egocentrism and criticisms of his work.

Unit Twelve: Learning Theory - How behaviour is acquired

  • Learning and conditioning - classical conditioning and operant conditioning; including explanations of extinction, discrimination and generalisation; positive and negative reinforcement; Social Learning Theory and criticisms.

Unit Thirteen: Freud's psychodynamic theory - An alternative approach

  • Personality structure, 5 stage theory, criticisms.

Unit Fourteen: Moral development

  • Definition in psychological terms; investigation of moral behaviour, moral feelings and moral judgement.

Unit Fifteen: The development of gender roles

  • Sex-typing; Gender identity; Biological, social and cultural theories.

Unit Sixteen: Aggression in children

  • Biological basis of aggression; Psychological theory and aggression; Aggression as a learned response;
  • Imitation of aggression; viewing violence; Punishment for aggression; sex differences in aggression.

Unit Seventeen: Methods used in child development research

  • Observational, Survey, Correlational, Experimental - advantages and disadvantages.

Unit Eighteen: Play

  • The importance of play to learning;
  • Piaget's theory of play; forms of play;
  • Relevance of psychological theories to pre-school education; Play and learning in nursery schools; Play therapy.

Unit Nineteen: Learning in school

  • Programmed learning and its relationship to learning theory - advantages and disadvantages; Discovery learning and its effectiveness.

Unit Twenty: Behaviour modification

  • Explanation and examples; Relationship to learning theory; Points systems, Advantages and disadvantages.

Requirements

The course has been designed to be accessible to people without prior knowledge of the subject or academic background. As such, there are no entry requirements. 

The approximate amount of time required to complete the course is: 200 hours

Qualifications

On successful completion of the course you will be issued with the Endorsed Award from ABC Awards:

Level 4 Child Psychology Certificate of Achievement

At the end of this course successful learners will receive a Certificate of Achievement by ABC Awards and a Learner Unit Summary (which lists the details of all the units you have completed as part of your course).

The course has been endorsed under the ABC Awards' Quality Licence Scheme. This means that learndirect have undergone an external quality check to ensure that the organisation and the courses it offers, meet certain quality criteria. The completion of this course alone does not lead to an Ofqual regulated qualification but may be used as evidence of knowledge and skills towards regulated qualifications in the future. The unit summary can be used as evidence towards Recognition of Prior Learning if you wish to progress your studies in this sector. To this end the learning outcomes of the course have been benchmarked at Level 4 against level descriptors published by Ofqual, to indicate the depth of study and level of difficulty involved in successful completion by the learner.

The course itself has been designed by learndirect to meet specific learners' or employers' requirements. ABC Awards' endorsement involves a robust and rigorous quality audit by external inspectors to ensure quality is consistently met. A regular review of courses is carried out as part of the endorsement process.

To view a sample of the ABC Certificate of Achievement, please click here

To view a sample of the ABC Learner Unit Summary, please click here

The course has been designed to be accessible to people without prior knowledge of the subject or academic background. As such, there are no entry requirements. 

The approximate amount of time required to complete the course is: 200 hours

If you wish to build your career in child psychology, you could continue your training and education to become a child psychologist working in schools, hospitals, mental health clinics, and more, with a starting salary of £25,000*/year. Another new and exciting opportunity could be to open your own practice.

The role of a child psychologist often involves working with a range of clients, from infants and toddlers to children and teens – though sometimes they specialise in working with a particular age group. Child psychologists help to understand, prevent, diagnose and treat developmental, cognitive, social and emotional issues.

*Source: careersinpsychology.co.uk, Nov. 2017

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