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Technology and Knowledge Management

Overview

We are living in an ‘Information Economy.’ As economies matured and developed from agricultural to industrial and then service and knowledge-based, the demand for information increased. The Industrial Revolution increased the need for information. Manufacturing began to be carried out on a large scale in factories by organised companies. This created a need for information for internal control for managers and on company performance for investors. Today, a modern organisation must produce financial and performance information for investors and managers, regulatory information for government agencies and personnel information as well as information for many other interested bodies, but it needs information to manage and control its operations.

The information-intensive needs of managers cover many areas from individual information on specific customers to strategic information for a corporate takeover. Globalisation has increased the need for information by making the management task more complex, often requiring the co-ordination of staff and tasks in different countries.

Development of economies has seen the production of more information-intensive and knowledge-intensive products such as computer software. The assets of companies such as Microsoft may be comprised largely of the value that stock markets place on their intangible assets of information and knowledge (intellectual capital). Tom Stewart (1991) describes intellectual capital as, ‘patents, processes, management skills, technologies, information about customers and suppliers and old-fashioned experience.’ Added together this knowledge is intellectual capital.

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the role of information in the business environment.
  • Appreciate the need for skills and knowledge in the use of information for supporting decision-making.
  • Effectively use and evaluate database systems for business decision-making.
  • Develop the ability to specify suitable information systems for effective knowledge management.

Modules

Introduction

  • Personal Learning Log
  • Introduction to Technology and Knowledge Management

Information Management

  • Introduction
  • What is Data?
  • What is Information?
  • What is Knowledge?
  • What is Management?
  • The Link Between Information and Management
  • Summary

Information Management and Information Systems

  • Using Technology to Manage Information
  • Benefits that ICT can offer
  • Overview of Technologies for Information Management
  • The Internet and Information Management
  • Intranets
  • Extranets
  • E-commerce and Business
  • Summary

Database Concepts and Use in Information Management

  • Introduction to Databases
  • History
  • Data Protection Act
  • Data Security
  • Database Management System
  • Metadata
  • Data Mining
  • Databases and Information Management
  • Reviewing Databases and Information Systems
  • Summary

Database Queries and Knowledge Creation

  • Data Warehousing
  • Semantic Web
  • Software Agents

Knowledge and Enterprise

  • Introduction
  • What is Knowledge?
  • What is Knowledge Management?
  • Tacit and Explicit Knowledge
  • Competitive Advantage and Knowledge
  • Reasons to Manage Knowledge
  • Creation of Communities of Excellence (Communities of Practice)
  • Knowledge Workers
  • Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy
  • Approaches to Developing a KM strategy
  • Conclusion

Knowledge Management and Information Systems

  • Introduction
  • Drivers for Knowledge Management
  • Managing Knowledge and Information Management

Decision-making and Decision Support Systems

  • Introduction
  • Role of Information in Decision-making
  • The Value of Information
  • Different Kinds of Systems
  • Major Types of Systems

Managing Information Systems to Support Knowledge

  • Management
  • Managing Knowledge Within the Organisation
  • Codification
  • Virtual Organisations

Requirements

There is no experience or previous qualifications required for enrolment on this course. It is available to all students, of all academic backgrounds.

Assessment

Assessment Method

After each lesson there will be a question paper, which needs to be completed and submitted to your personal tutor for marking. This method of continual assessment ensures that your personal tutor can consistently monitor your progress and provide you with assistance throughout the duration of the course.

What's Included

  • All study materials
  • Study Guide
  • Full Tutor and Admin support

Course Text

For this course you will be required to purchase the textbook:

Oz E (2004), Management Information Systems, 4th Edition, Boston, Thomson Course Technology.

This course reader has been chosen because it presents the information on management information systems in an interesting and interactive way, and encourages a high level of student participation. ACD-Rom accompanies the book. This contains other material, including video clips.

We are living in an ‘Information Economy.’ As economies matured and developed from agricultural to industrial and then service and knowledge-based, the demand for information increased. The Industrial Revolution increased the need for information. Manufacturing began to be carried out on a large scale in factories by organised companies. This created a need for information for internal control for managers and on company performance for investors. Today, a modern organisation must produce financial and performance information for investors and managers, regulatory information for government agencies and personnel information as well as information for many other interested bodies, but it needs information to manage and control its operations.

The information-intensive needs of managers cover many areas from individual information on specific customers to strategic information for a corporate takeover. Globalisation has increased the need for information by making the management task more complex, often requiring the co-ordination of staff and tasks in different countries.

Development of economies has seen the production of more information-intensive and knowledge-intensive products such as computer software. The assets of companies such as Microsoft may be comprised largely of the value that stock markets place on their intangible assets of information and knowledge (intellectual capital). Tom Stewart (1991) describes intellectual capital as, ‘patents, processes, management skills, technologies, information about customers and suppliers and old-fashioned experience.’ Added together this knowledge is intellectual capital.

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the role of information in the business environment.
  • Appreciate the need for skills and knowledge in the use of information for supporting decision-making.
  • Effectively use and evaluate database systems for business decision-making.
  • Develop the ability to specify suitable information systems for effective knowledge management.

Modules

Introduction

  • Personal Learning Log
  • Introduction to Technology and Knowledge Management

Information Management

  • Introduction
  • What is Data?
  • What is Information?
  • What is Knowledge?
  • What is Management?
  • The Link Between Information and Management
  • Summary

Information Management and Information Systems

  • Using Technology to Manage Information
  • Benefits that ICT can offer
  • Overview of Technologies for Information Management
  • The Internet and Information Management
  • Intranets
  • Extranets
  • E-commerce and Business
  • Summary

Database Concepts and Use in Information Management

  • Introduction to Databases
  • History
  • Data Protection Act
  • Data Security
  • Database Management System
  • Metadata
  • Data Mining
  • Databases and Information Management
  • Reviewing Databases and Information Systems
  • Summary

Database Queries and Knowledge Creation

  • Data Warehousing
  • Semantic Web
  • Software Agents

Knowledge and Enterprise

  • Introduction
  • What is Knowledge?
  • What is Knowledge Management?
  • Tacit and Explicit Knowledge
  • Competitive Advantage and Knowledge
  • Reasons to Manage Knowledge
  • Creation of Communities of Excellence (Communities of Practice)
  • Knowledge Workers
  • Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy
  • Approaches to Developing a KM strategy
  • Conclusion

Knowledge Management and Information Systems

  • Introduction
  • Drivers for Knowledge Management
  • Managing Knowledge and Information Management

Decision-making and Decision Support Systems

  • Introduction
  • Role of Information in Decision-making
  • The Value of Information
  • Different Kinds of Systems
  • Major Types of Systems

Managing Information Systems to Support Knowledge

  • Management
  • Managing Knowledge Within the Organisation
  • Codification
  • Virtual Organisations

Requirements

There is no experience or previous qualifications required for enrolment on this course. It is available to all students, of all academic backgrounds.

Assessment

Assessment Method

After each lesson there will be a question paper, which needs to be completed and submitted to your personal tutor for marking. This method of continual assessment ensures that your personal tutor can consistently monitor your progress and provide you with assistance throughout the duration of the course.

What's Included

  • All study materials
  • Study Guide
  • Full Tutor and Admin support

Course Text

For this course you will be required to purchase the textbook:

Oz E (2004), Management Information Systems, 4th Edition, Boston, Thomson Course Technology.

This course reader has been chosen because it presents the information on management information systems in an interesting and interactive way, and encourages a high level of student participation. ACD-Rom accompanies the book. This contains other material, including video clips.

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